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are not hatch in three days. it would take three long weeks for those eggs to hatch. the civil rights movement taught me patience. never give up, never to give in, to never give up, but to always keep your eyes on the prize. so across the bridge is about patients, about how, truth, love and reconciliation. now when i was growing up in rural alabama and was visiting a town of troy, visiting montgomery, visited tuskegee and later as a student in nashville, tennessee and made a living in atlanta. i saw the sign said white men, colored women, colored rating, white waiting. as a child my mother, father, grandparents said that's the way it is. don't get in the way, don't get in trouble. but in 1855 at the age of 15, i heard of rosa parks. i heard of martin luther king junior. in 1957 at the age of 17 i never said parks. the next year at the age of 18, i meant to her martin luther king junior. the action of rosa parks, people in my camera and leadership of dr. king inspired me to get in the way, to get in trouble. for more than 50 years have been getting in trouble, good chabot, necessary travel. [ap
a program called, who is the dean of the civil rights movement, dean of black leadership, who at the whole idea about the march on washington almost 50 years ago would say from time to time, maybe our foremothers and forefathers thought came to this great land in different shapes. but we all in the same boat now. so it doesn't matter whether we are black or white, latino, asian american or native american. it doesn't matter whether a democrat or republicans. it doesn't matter whether we are straight. it does another whether jewish or not psalm, christians, we are one people. we are one family. we are one house spirit that's what the struggle been about. [applause] this book, "across that bridge" is saying in effect they struggle is a struggle to retain the soul of america. it's not a struggled the last one day, one week, one month, one year for one lifetime. maybe we take more than one lifetime to create a more perfect union. to create the beloved community. the community at peace with itself. now you heard david tell you that i did get arrested a few times. and young people coming out chi
. and, of course, their own country, lawyers have experience a lot of pain in the civil rights movement. so my question is, in line with the comment about practical steps, what would be a facing of the introduction of the rule of law that might be suggested to the chinese government and to chinese political and legal leaders as a way to avoid these calamitous events and bring about the rule of law? >> can you suggest to them that they pay the judges and say we will reducers our, we won't fire you? they might be willing to do that. and after they did that, you know, judges would love it, and nobody else would like it. but i mean, they would do, or maybe they would say we have an administrative law grow here. by the way, let's have all the corporate cities on television. the proceeding, i'm not saying the deliberations. why don't he they do that? let's not get into that. 5 let's have the trials and all those things. they do that. maybe they would, or maybe, what about this arbitration resolving business differences, would you be willing to take some the judges? after all, you're not payin
contributor and civil rights and law professor avery friedman. morning, avery. >> good morning, carol. >> i think the thing that stands out for most people is that this man was convicted of murder for killing his grandmother who was 92 years old. apparently he beat her to death and he was on parole. he only served 17 years. how is that possible? >> yeah, it seems impossible to happen. but if you study this, spengler was in his late 20s when he committed this murder. and one would expect that he would have spent the rest of his life in the new york penal system. the fact is, though, that he was paroled out and actually had an obligation to report to his parole officer until this happened. but the fact is that it struck me as virtually impossible for the parole department not to know that this guy was a problem. the fact that he committed this murder -- again, even though he was in his 20s, unless he was a model person in the penitentiary, it would seem pretty obvious that there was a problem with this guy and of course the worst happened here. and we will never know, although we do tend to t
of the civil rights movement and the life or death decisions being made during the cuban missile crisis. >> caroline kennedy joins "listening in" editor on the discussion on the 1962 recordings of the late president from office. tuesday evening at 7:00 in eastern on c-span2. >> "washington journal" continues. host: we want to welcome back to our table, bill bennett. let's just continue the conversation we were having with our viewers. does religion and flow of your politics? guest: sure, i think it influences a lot of people's politics. daniel patrick moynihan, a democrat senator from new york, one of the great men of the senate -- george will things he was the model of will a senator should be -- taught us all that culture is more important than politics and terms of moving a society. political leaders in politics can alter the culture. we can see that effect, too. but culture really affects politics more than a big part of the culture is religion, what people believe. the best example i can think of would be martin luther king, jr.. he was a minister of the christian faith. he had a p
leaders say the constitution takes away many of their rights. in syria's civil war, rebel forces appear to be gaining ground against the assad regime. sctivists say the rebels captured the town of harem along the turkish border after a cttle that lasted four weeks. the rebels had already captured other towns in the area and at least three military bases. thpe benedict spoke up today for the 40,000 killed in syria in inarly two years of fighting. ,n his christmas address, he denounced the slaughter of the defenseless. inialso urged palestinians and israelis to find the courage to negotiate. the housing industry is coming back, and guess who is on a buying spree? and this could be a huge advance in space flight. spreusable rocket. when the cbs evening news continues. continues. if you have high blood pressure and get a cold get coricidin hbp. the number one pharmacist recommended cold brand designed for people with high blood pressure. and the only one i use to relieve my cold symptoms without raising my blood pressure. coricidin hbp. anyone have occasional constipation, diarrhea, gas, bl
quantities at all. patti ann: well, right. and as you mentioned, this is a civil war. >> yeah. patti ann: if assad exits, it's far from over. there are various possible outcomes here. do you see the rebels, though, being able to forge some kind of a government that can work with itself? >> it's possible, but within the rebel factions there are over 4,000 foreign fighters. their loyalty is to jihad. they're there as jihadists just as they were to al-qaeda in iraq. when they were killing americans. so they're not, their interest is not in the future of syria. their interest is in the future of an islamist state. so that's why if anybody gets in there, the deal has to be -- and assad needs to make this deal with someone who he thinks can honor it -- we need to lock down those weapons first and have a presence of we'll call it an adult country rather than the civil war participantsdividing the spoils of that very lucrative arms cache. patti ann: yeah. what is the likelihood that a non-islamist state, a more democratic type of government will emerge from all of this? >> well, that's very diff
believe that our civil liberties and our right to privacy need to be protected, and i do not believe that they're sufficiently protected under the current law. and so, simply extending current law for five more years is irresponsible, and it's not a rephrebg shun of our -- reflection of our values. there are few ways this bill falls short and i'm especially concerned about the practice of reverse targeting. the deputy majority leader talked about it about an hour ago. the intelligence community does not need a warrant to conduct surveillance on someone located overseas, and i think we can all agree there is no problem there. the problem comes when the intelligence committee conducts surveillance on someone overseas where the real purpose is to gain information about someone right here in america. that can happen without a warrant, and we should not let that happen without a warrant. our national security is not threatened if we require this information to be tagged and sequestered and subject to judicial review. it would merely ensure that the information intercepted overseas in the
this civil war will end. >> you know, this has been a war of attrition. you said, yes, that's right, it has been nearly two years. over 40,000 people killed, seems to get worse day after day. and all this happening at a time when in syria now you have the joint u.n. arab league envoy, lack barba lakhdar brahimi there. you have the rebels saying they're taking one of the key bases in the north of the country, on a highway that connects aleppo to damascus and yet still they cannot claim that they have won. it seems that the rebels are gaining momentum. we hear this more from the opposition activists, from the rebel free syrian army, but the government maintains they're ridding the territories across syria of the rebels, of the terrorists as they call them. and it just seems to be spiraling more and more out of control at a time when there is so much concern about what is going on in syria and so much pressure on the opposition and the syrian government to come to some sort of settlement of their disputes so the people of syria can live in peace once again. >> it is crushing news for hundreds
the truck was actually carrying. there is no word yetcaused this. jamie: well, right now there is word of a high level defection in syria's civil war as the general of the country's military police reportedly switches sides and joins the opposition. ambassador john bolton joining us now, former u.n. ambassador to the united nations fox news contributor. am bass do, great to see you. thanks for joining us. >> good morning. merry christmas belatedly. jamie: merry christmas to you. how significant is this defection away from assad. >> i think it has couple important aspects. this is another high level general. there is political implication there. we'll have to wait and see whether it induces other regime military authorities to defect as well. second, for the opposition undoubtedly this will give them important information about what's going on inside assad's military, perhaps inside the regime itself. what's the disposition of forces? are they well-armed? what is their morale? where might they be vulnerable? whether this general is welcomed by the opposition and contributes to them mili
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10